Johan Sundberg

Articles

Flow Glottogram Characteristics and Perceived Degree of Phonatory Pressedness
Journal of Voice (2016) Vol. 30, No. 3, pp. 287-292

Phonatory pressedness is a clinically relevant aspect of voice, which generally is analyzed by auditory perception. The present investigation aimed at identifying voice source and formant characteristics related to experts' ratings of phonatory pressedness. Study Design: Experimental study of the ...

Relationship Between Subglottal Pressure and Sound Pressure Level in Untrained Voices
Journal of Voice (2016) Vol. 30, No. 1, pp. 15-20

Subglottal pressure (Ps) is strongly correlated with sound pressure level (SPL) and is easy to measure by means of commonly available equipment. The SPL/Ps ratio is strongly dependent on the efficiency of the phonatory apparatus and should be of great ...

Contact Quotient Versus Closed Quotient: A Comparative Study on Professional Male Singers
Journal of Voice (2015) Vol. 29, No. 2, pp. 148-154

The term "closed quotient" is frequently used for data derived both from inverse filtering and from electroglottography. In the former case, it is defined as the ratio between the closed phase and the period, as measured in flow glottograms (FLOGG), ...

Loudness and Pitch of Kunqu Opera
Journal of Voice (2014) Vol. 28, No. 1, pp. 14-19

Equivalent sound level (Leq), sound pressure level (SPL), and fundamental frequency (F0) are analyzed in each of five Kunqu Opera roles, Young girl and Young woman, Young man, Old man, and Colorful face. Their pitch ranges are similar to those ...

Collision and Phonation Threshold Pressures Before and After Loud, Prolonged Vocalization in Trained and Untrained Voices
Journal of Voice (2013) Vol. 27, No. 5, pp. 527-530

The phonation threshold pressure (PTP) is defined as the lowest subglottal pressure needed for obtaining and sustaining vocal fold oscillation. It has been found to increase during vocal fatigue. In the present study, PTP is measured together with the threshold ...

Intonation and Expressivity: A Single Case Study of Classical Western Singing
Journal of Voice (2013) Vol. 27, No. 3, pp. 391.e1-391.e8

Previous studies have shown that singers tend to sharpen phrase-peak tones as compared with equally tempered tuning (ETT). Here we test the hypothesis that this can serve the purpose of musical expressivity. Data were drawn from earlier recordings, where a ...

Subglottal Pressure Oscillations Accompanying Phonation
Journal of Voice (2013) Vol. 27, No. 4, pp. 411-421

Acoustic and aerodynamic properties of the voice source and vocal tract have been extensively analyzed during the last half century. Corresponding investigations of the subglottal system are rare but can be assumed to be relevant to voice production. In the ...

Formant Tuning Strategies in Professional Male Opera Singer
Journal of Voice (2013) Vol. 27, No. 3, pp. 278-288

The term "formant tuning" is generally used for the case that one of the lowest formant frequencies coincides with the frequency of a source spectrum partial. Some authors claim that such coincidence is favorable and belongs to the goals of ...

La, et al.
Pregnancy and the Singing Voice: Reports from a Case Study
Journal of Voice (2012) Vol. 26, No. 4, pp. 431-439

Significant changes in body tissues occur during pregnancy; however, literature concerning the effects of pregnancy on the voice is sparse, especially concerning the professional classicly trained voice. Hormonal variations and associated bodily changes during pregnancy affect phonatory conditions, such as ...

Acoustical Study of Classical Peking Opera Singing
Journal of Voice (2012) Vol. 26, No. 2, pp. 137-143

Acoustic characteristics of classical opera singing differ considerably between the Western and the Chinese cultures. Singers in the classical Peking opera tradition specialize on one out of a limited number of standard roles. Audio and electroglottograph signals were recorded for ...